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This diary entry is written by kristino. ( View all entries )
 

alpharetta, georgia trip.Category: (general)
Thursday, 22 March 2007
03:49:50 AM (GMT)

well this has been an okay trip.
i came down from my home state, tennessee to georgia for vacation.
we are staying at my cousins' house but my cousins aren't even here.
so we're just kindof renting their house for free, lol.
today we drove into downtown georgia to see the world's largest aquarium.
it was cool, but kind of dull though thats just my opinion.
i was having a weird breathing problem too.
...i knew i was breathing but it didn't feel like it and there was so much
construction downtown that i felt like
i was breathing in constant debree and it was disgusting.
anyways,
i can't wait to get home tommorrow.
i'll finally be reunited with my cellphone and able to see my friends again.

on april, 1st anberlin is playing at rockettown!!(in nashville)
so if you live close by then come!
its going to be an AWESOME show!

-kristino™

Comments 
‹~~*Demon~*From~*Death*Vally*~~› says:   12 March 2011   435044  
I am a 13 year old girl. I have red hair and blue/green eyes. I love
to make new
friends and to chat. i am a huge renamon fan so that is why my
nickname is
Renamon101.I do not like people who are looking for sex online. the
only thing i
have to say to them is GET A REAL LIFE!!!!!!! and F YOU!!!!!! but
other than that i
would love to chat with you so i hope to hear from you soon. LOVE
YA!!!!!

Last edited: 3 August 2008
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Comments 
[Renamon101] 	
Renamon101 says: 	  3 August 2008   496998  

i roc!

[‹~~*Demon~*From~*Death*Vally*~~›] 	
‹~~*Demon~*From~*Death*Vally*~~› says : 	  1 second ago   467050 


to sport head-scarves referred to as shash, and also often cover
their
upper body with a shawl known as garbasaar. Unmarried or young women,
however, do
not always cover their heads. Traditional Arabian garb such as the
male jellabiya
(jellabiyaad in Somali) and the female jilbāb is also commonly worn.
For some
occasions such as festivals, women may adorn themselves with
specialized jewelry and
head-dresses similar to those worn by the Berber tribes of the
Maghreb.[29]

A lot of Djibouti's original art is passed on and preserved orally,
mainly through
song. Many examples of Islamic, Ottoman, and French influences can
also be noted in
the local buildings, which contain plasterwork, carefully constructed
motifs and
calligraphy.
See also: Music of Djibouti and List of African writers (by
country)#Djibouti
Education
Main article: Education in Djibouti

Education in Djibouti is strongly influenced by France.[30] Although
the government
effort resulted in an increase in enrollment during the 1990s, the
education system
is still below people’s expectations and the needs of a developing
nation.[31]
There are 81 public primary schools, 24 registered private primary
schools, 12
secondary schools and two vocational schools in Djibouti.[30][32]
Female gross
enrollment rate was at 21.9% and male gross enrollment rate was at
29.0% in
2007.[33]
See also
Flag of Djibouti.svg 	Djibouti portal
Main articles: Outline of Djibouti and Index of Djibouti-related
articles

    Communications in Djibouti
    Foreign relations of Djibouti
    Military of Djibouti
    Transport in Djibouti
        Ethio-Djibouti Railways

	

    Scouting in Djibouti
    Somali people
    Afar people
    Afar triangle
    Arab League
    Pan Sahel Initiative


References

    ^ a b c "Djibouti". World Factbook. Central Intelligence Agency.
2007-09-06.
Retrieved 2007-09-18.
    ^ Department of Economic and Social Affairs Population Division
(2009) (PDF).
World Population Prospects, Table A.1. 2008 revision. United Nations.
Retrieved
2009-03-12.
    ^ a b c d "Djibouti". International Monetary Fund. Retrieved
2010-04-21.
    ^ Human Development Report 2009. The United Nations. Retrieved 5
October 2009.
    ^ "Communication Officielle des Resultats du Recensement
Général
de la
Population". Ministère de l'Economie, des Finances et de la
Planification,
Djibouti. 2010. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
    ^ World Bank country data Djibouti (2009) (number rounded)
    ^ [1]
    ^ [2]
    ^ United Nations member states
    ^ [3]
    ^ A Country Study: Somalia from The Library of Congress
    ^ Hugh Chisholm (ed.
 
‹~~*Demon~*From~*Death*Vally*~~› says:   12 March 2011   644373  
03:49:50 AM (GMT)


well this has been an okay trip.
i came down from my home state, tennessee to georgia for vacation.
we are staying at my cousins' house but my cousins aren't even here.
so we're just kindof renting their house for free, lol.
today we drove into downtown georgia to see the world's largest
aquarium.
it was cool, but kind of dull though thats just my opinion.
i was having a weird breathing problem too.
...i knew i was breathing but it didn't feel like it and there was so
much
construction downtown that i felt like
i was breathing in constant debree and it was disgusting.
anyways,
i can't wait to get home tommorrow.
i'll finally be reunited with my cellphone and able to see my friends
again.

on april, 1st anberlin is playing at rockettown!!(in nashville)
so if you live close by then come!
its going to be an AWESOME sh
 
‹~~*Demon~*From~*Death*Vally*~~› says:   12 March 2011   511021  
03:49:50 AM (GMT)


well this has been an okay trip.
i came down from my home state, tennessee to georgia for vacation.
we are staying at my cousins' house but my cousins aren't even here.
so we're just kindof renting their house for free, lol.
today we drove into downtown georgia to see the world's largest
aquarium.
it was cool, but kind of dull though thats just my opinion.
i was having a weird breathing problem too.
...i knew i was breathing but it didn't feel like it and there was so
much
construction downtown that i felt like
i was breathing in constant debree and it was disgusting.
anyways,
i can't wait to get home tommorrow.
i'll finally be reunited with my cellphone and able to see my friends
again.

on april, 1st anberlin is playing at rockettown!!(in nashville)
so if you live close by then come!
its going to be an AWESOME sh
 
‹►Lord♪The♪Đestroyer♪of♪Đreams◄› says:   8 June 2011   726352  
to sport head-scarves referred to as shash, and also often cover
their
upper body with a shawl known as garbasaar. Unmarried or young women,
however, do
not always cover their heads. Traditional Arabian garb such as the
male jellabiya
(jellabiyaad in Somali) and the female jilbāb is also commonly worn.
For some
occasions such as festivals, women may adorn themselves with
specialized jewelry and
head-dresses similar to those worn by the Berber tribes of the
Maghreb.[29]

A lot of Djibouti's original art is passed on and preserved orally,
mainly through
song. Many examples of Islamic, Ottoman, and French influences can
also be noted in
the local buildings, which contain plasterwork, carefully constructed
motifs and
calligraphy.
See also: Music of Djibouti and List of African writers (by
country)#Djibouti
Education
Main article: Education in Djibouti

Education in Djibouti is strongly influenced by France.[30] Although
the government
effort resulted in an increase in enrollment during the 1990s, the
education system
is still below people’s expectations and the needs of a developing
nation.[31]
There are 81 public primary schools, 24 registered private primary
schools, 12
secondary schools and two vocational schools in Djibouti.[30][32]
Female gross
enrollment rate was at 21.9% and male gross enrollment rate was at
29.0% in
2007.[33]
See also
Flag of Djibouti.svg 	Djibouti portal
Main articles: Outline of Djibouti and Index of Djibouti-related
articleshffyj
 
‹►Lord♪The♪Đestroyer♪of♪Đreams◄› says:   8 June 2011   609367  
to sport head-scarves referred to as shash, and also often cover
their
upper body with a shawl known as garbasaar. Unmarried or young women,
however, do
not always cover their heads. Traditional Arabian garb such as the
male jellabiya
(jellabiyaad in Somali) and the female jilbāb is also commonly worn.
For some
occasions such as festivals, women may adorn themselves with
specialized jewelry and
head-dresses similar to those worn by the Berber tribes of the
Maghreb.[29]

A lot of Djibouti's original art is passed on and preserved orally,
mainly through
song. Many examples of Islamic, Ottoman, and French influences can
also be noted in
the local buildings, which contain plasterwork, carefully constructed
motifs and
calligraphy.
See also: Music of Djibouti and List of African writers (by
country)#Djibouti
Education
Main article: Education in Djibouti

Education in Djibouti is strongly influenced by France.[30] Although
the government
effort resulted in an increase in enrollment during the 1990s, the
education system
is still below people’s expectations and the needs of a developing
nation.[31]
There are 81 public primary schools, 24 registered private primary
schools, 12
secondary schools and two vocational schools in Djibouti.[30][32]
Female gross
enrollment rate was at 21.9% and male gross enrollment rate was at
29.0% in
2007.[33]
See also
Flag of Djibouti.svg 	Djibouti portal
Main articles: Outline of Djibouti and Index of Djibouti-related
articlesookk
 
‹►Lord♪The♪Đestroyer♪of♪Đreams◄› says :   8 June 2011   189367  
to sport head-scarves referred to as shash, and also often cover
their
upper body with a shawl known as garbasaar. Unmarried or young women,
however, do
not always cover their heads. Traditional Arabian garb such as the
male jellabiya
(jellabiyaad in Somali) and the female jilbāb is also commonly worn.
For some
occasions such as festivals, women may adorn themselves with
specialized jewelry and
head-dresses similar to those worn by the Berber tribes of the
Maghreb.[29]

A lot of Djibouti's original art is passed on and preserved orally,
mainly through
song. Many examples of Islamic, Ottoman, and French influences can
also be noted in
the local buildings, which contain plasterwork, carefully constructed
motifs and
calligraphy.
See also: Music of Djibouti and List of African writers (by
country)#Djibouti
Education
Main article: Education in Djibouti

Education in Djibouti is strongly influenced by France.[30] Although
the government
effort resulted in an increase in enrollment during the 1990s, the
education system
is still below people’s expectations and the needs of a developing
nation.[31]
There are 81 public primary schools, 24 registered private primary
schools, 12
secondary schools and two vocational schools in Djibouti.[30][32]
Female gross
enrollment rate was at 21.9% and male gross enrollment rate was at
29.0% in
2007.[33]
See also
Flag of Djibouti.svg 	Djibouti portal
Main articles: Outline of Djibouti and Index of Djibouti-related
articles
 

 
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